Blog Break and Series Fact Sheet

Photo Credit: Illustration from “The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton”, Sydney Paget, Strand Magazine, 1904: Sebastian Wallroth/Wikimedia Commons/PD Art (PD Old 100) Thank you to all the wonderful people who are continuing to check out my blog. The support and encouragement has been overwhelming! I will be traveling abroad for the next several months so … Continue reading Blog Break and Series Fact Sheet

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Not So HAE (Happily Ever After)

The epitome of the happily-ever-after romance ending — the handsome couple off against the sunset with the calm waters and the palm tree. Photo Credit: Silhouette of a loving couple against a sunset, uploaded 25 April 2017 by 5187396: 5187396/Pixabay/CC0 1.0 “We are writers and we destroy lives and worlds and ideologies. And sometimes, we … Continue reading Not So HAE (Happily Ever After)

The Emotional Badlands of Language, or, Language is Not Just Data

Photo Credit: Canadian singer Leonard Cohen in Trouville-sur-Mer (Normandy, France), taken 26 January 1988 by Roland Godefroy: Teddyyy/Wikimedia Commons/CC BY 3.0 “If words are the arrow, we ourselves — our interior landscapes, our outward actions, the authenticity of our lives — are the bow.” (Popova, par. 1) As many of my blog readers know, I … Continue reading The Emotional Badlands of Language, or, Language is Not Just Data

Creative Limitations

Photo Credit: Book, phone, and computer in chains, created and uploaded on 24 January 2015 by stevepb: stevepb/Pixabay/CC0 1.0 “I had to let go … then come back to the [book] understanding the new limitations as creative challenges.” (Tea, par. 4) I came across an interview with West Coast writer Michelle Tea quite some time … Continue reading Creative Limitations

Literary vs. Commercial Fiction – Better or Different?

Photo Credit: Books on the shelf of an Amazon bookstore with all the covers facing front, location unknown, uploaded 21 March 2016 by Brian Chow: bchow/Flickr/CC BY 2.0 “[Literary and commercial fiction are] serve different purposes in our society.” (Levin, par. 2) When I first discovered writing at the age of fourteen, I didn’t read … Continue reading Literary vs. Commercial Fiction – Better or Different?

Unhappy Accidents: Why Writers Hate Their Own Work

Photo Credit: Book trash, taken 7 October 2017 by Paul Sableman: Meisam/Wikimedia Commons/CC BY 2.0 “[S]ome authors grow to dislike, disown, resent, or regret their books after publication—whether because of an unexpected critical or popular response, changes in their own views, or simple aging.” (Temple, par. 1) The idea that an author might hate a book … Continue reading Unhappy Accidents: Why Writers Hate Their Own Work