Science, Ghosts and Haunted Houses: Three 19th Century Classic Women Horror Writers

Photo Credit: Mr. T. P. Cooke, of the Theatre Royal Covent Garden, in the character of the monster in the dramatic romance of Frankenstein, 1823 production of Presumption; or, the fate of Frankenstein, lithograph reproduction of an original painting by Nathanial Whittock and Thomas Charles Wageman, The New York Public Library: Tronvillian/ Wikimedia Commons/PD Old … Continue reading Science, Ghosts and Haunted Houses: Three 19th Century Classic Women Horror Writers

Unlikely Pairings: Grotesque Domestic Fiction

  Not exactly the Mom and Dad you would picture for the traditional (and fabled) nuclear family, is it? Photo Credit: A Grotesque Couple: Old Woman with an Elaborate Headdress and Old Man with Large Ears and Lacking a Chin, 1491 or 93 – 1570, Giovanni Francesco Melzi, pen and brown ink, Metropolitan Museum of … Continue reading Unlikely Pairings: Grotesque Domestic Fiction

Literary vs. Commercial Fiction – Better or Different?

Photo Credit: Books on the shelf of an Amazon bookstore with all the covers facing front, location unknown, uploaded 21 March 2016 by Brian Chow: bchow/Flickr/CC BY 2.0 “[Literary and commercial fiction are] serve different purposes in our society.” (Levin, par. 2) When I first discovered writing at the age of fourteen, I didn’t read … Continue reading Literary vs. Commercial Fiction – Better or Different?

Unhappy Accidents: Why Writers Hate Their Own Work

Photo Credit: Book trash, taken 7 October 2017 by Paul Sableman: Meisam/Wikimedia Commons/CC BY 2.0 “[S]ome authors grow to dislike, disown, resent, or regret their books after publication—whether because of an unexpected critical or popular response, changes in their own views, or simple aging.” (Temple, par. 1) The idea that an author might hate a book … Continue reading Unhappy Accidents: Why Writers Hate Their Own Work